Praying over these next 13 days

Re-post:

Wednesday, August 13
making it into the next season

I've been reflecting that the time we're in is like a team that's going into the fourth quarter of a good, but tiring game. Victory nor defeat is assured. The whole team has to hang in there and fight to have a chance of winning.

What's the counsel from scripture?

Continue steadfastly in prayer, being watchful in it with thanksgiving.
Colossians 4:2


This little verse says everything you need. What it says in plan English is:

1. Stay in the place of prayer
2. Be vigilant
3. And take communion continually

We need to keep ourselves positioned in prayer. Distraction might be our worst enemy right now. All prayer is not constant talking out loud either. Prayer is staying connected, staying available, staying awake to God.

Being watchful is also about staying focused but also about staying sober. Sober mindedness is to keep the fog out and not be be carried away by things that take you away from prayer focus. A vigilant watchman is passionate about keeping watch.

The third one might be the hardest to get. In high church, they call communion or the Lord's supper, the eucharist; which means cup of thanksgiving. Eucharista is the word here for thanksgiving. The one thing we are most thankful for is Christ. Christian prayer is Christ centered and that is the point. Christ has already done the work. Christ is in heaven interceding. The whole Christian life is centered on Christ. We just need to keep this awareness. Taking communion continually is living in the awareness of and being perpetually thankful for Christ and communing with Christ. And we do this together celebrating and partaking in community. The power of your prayers comes from Christ. and you are thankful as you participate in his plan being brought into existence.

This is My Father's World

This is my Father's world, and to my listening ears
All nature sings, and round me rings the music of the spheres.
This is my Father's world: I rest me in the thought
Of rocks and trees, of skies and seas;
His hand the wonders wrought.
This is my Father's world, the birds their carols raise,
The morning light, the lily white, declare their Maker's praise.
This is my Father's world: He shines in all that's fair;
In the rustling grass I hear Him pass;
He speaks to me everywhere.
This is my Father's world. O let me ne'er forget
That though the wrong seems oft so strong, God is the ruler yet.
This is my Father's world: the battle is not done;
Jesus who died shall be satisfied,
And earth and heaven be one.

This song was written by Maltbie Davenport Babcock (1858-1901) and was published after his untimely death. The story behind this hymn, according to center for church music :
Maltbie Babcock, a pastor in Lockport, New York, enjoyed hiking in an area called "the escarpment"-an ancient upthrust ledge near the city. Heading out on such walks, he often proclaimed that "I am going out to see my Father's world." And from his vantage point on the escarpment, he had a beautiful view of God's creation indeed; from the greens of farms and orchards to the blues of Lake Ontario.
It's said that these walks inspired the words to "This Is My Father's World." Babcock's lovely hymn was not published, however, until after his untimely death in 1901. At that time his wife, Catherine, collected and published many of his writings, including the poetry to "This Is My Father's World."
Franklin L. Sheppard, a friend of Babcock's, composed the hymn melody, Terra Beata, after his death. The hymn was first published in Alleluia, a Presbyterian songbook for children, published in 1915. Edward Shippen Barnes is credited as the arranger. Barnes also arranged Angles We Have Heard on High, and composed the carol, "Hush, my dear, lie still and slumber", as well as several Organ Symphonies.

Travail intercession

Now why do you cry aloud?
Is there no king in you?
Has your counselor perished,
that pain seized you like a woman in labor?
Micah 4:9

Thousands of people are praying for the election and their prayers are already having an affect.