This is My Father's World

This is my Father's world, and to my listening ears
All nature sings, and round me rings the music of the spheres.
This is my Father's world: I rest me in the thought
Of rocks and trees, of skies and seas;
His hand the wonders wrought.
This is my Father's world, the birds their carols raise,
The morning light, the lily white, declare their Maker's praise.
This is my Father's world: He shines in all that's fair;
In the rustling grass I hear Him pass;
He speaks to me everywhere.
This is my Father's world. O let me ne'er forget
That though the wrong seems oft so strong, God is the ruler yet.
This is my Father's world: the battle is not done;
Jesus who died shall be satisfied,
And earth and heaven be one.

This song was written by Maltbie Davenport Babcock (1858-1901) and was published after his untimely death. The story behind this hymn, according to center for church music :
Maltbie Babcock, a pastor in Lockport, New York, enjoyed hiking in an area called "the escarpment"-an ancient upthrust ledge near the city. Heading out on such walks, he often proclaimed that "I am going out to see my Father's world." And from his vantage point on the escarpment, he had a beautiful view of God's creation indeed; from the greens of farms and orchards to the blues of Lake Ontario.
It's said that these walks inspired the words to "This Is My Father's World." Babcock's lovely hymn was not published, however, until after his untimely death in 1901. At that time his wife, Catherine, collected and published many of his writings, including the poetry to "This Is My Father's World."
Franklin L. Sheppard, a friend of Babcock's, composed the hymn melody, Terra Beata, after his death. The hymn was first published in Alleluia, a Presbyterian songbook for children, published in 1915. Edward Shippen Barnes is credited as the arranger. Barnes also arranged Angles We Have Heard on High, and composed the carol, "Hush, my dear, lie still and slumber", as well as several Organ Symphonies.

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