Come Let Me Love You, Love me Again

You fill up my senses
Like a night in a forest
Like the mountains in springtime
Like a walk in the rain
Like a storm in the desert
Like a sleepy blue ocean
You fill up my senses
Come fill me again

Come let me love you
Let me give my life to you
Let me drown in your laughter
Let me die in your arms
Let me lay down beside you
Let me always be with you
Come let me love you
Come love me again

You fill up my senses
Like a night in a forest
Like the mountains in springtime
Like a walk in the rain
Like a storm in the desert
Like a sleepy blue ocean
You fill up my senses
Come fill me again

"I am a song. I live to be sung. I sing it with all my heart. And that is the essence of who John was and is." -Annie Denver

Photo: Pixabay
I recently watched the wedding video, of my nephew's recent wedding, and I saw so much joy and pageantry.  The smiles on the faces, the celebration, and the sheer beauty.  It was outdoors, in a beautiful vineyard setting.

We make a big deal of our weddings, because they are a big deal.  Two lives are being joined, becoming one, and then they will usually have the awesome responsibility to be parents.  God's plan or design has always been for a man and a woman to find each other, and come together, uniting their lives.

As wonderful as that is, there is something more awesome and deeper about the wedding, because of what it points to.  That is, the relationship between the Lord Jesus Christ, and his bride, the church.  The church is Jesus' bride, we are the bride of Christ.

The reason why weddings are awe inspiring, whether they are small of big, on a shoe-string budget, or extravagant; is because of how that event, that wedding, resonates with the impending event of Jesus Christ's wedding to his bride, the church.  You can not make too big a deal of your wedding, because it is a reflection of the very big wedding to come.

What does that have to do with John Denver's song?  I believe in common grace and prevenient grace.  Whether a poet knows it or not, God created love.  Whether a poet believes it or not, God and his son are worthy to be praised, worshiped, and adored.

I believe that the love that people have and display towards one another, whether or not they are believers, comes from God.  Romantic love, friendship love, and parental love are gifts from God.  God also invented erotic love as well.  The Bible teaches us about all these.

John Denver wrote this song for his wife, Annie.  John had a gift with words and music.  He tapped into a love that men and women perhaps can only have fully fulfilled in their relationship with God.

We might love our spouse, or spouse to be, so much that we feel our heads spin, like we are floating, and we call it "head-over-heels-in-love".  God invented that.

John's poetry is about his love for his then wife, but it resonates with God's love for me, for us.  I'm not saying that God put the words in John's mouth, but what I believe is that, in John's longing for his wife, he tapped into God's love for us and our reciprocation of that love.

John Denver was the oldest son of an alcoholic, air force bomber pilot, of German ancestory, "who was stern and could not show love towards his children", according to his wikipedia bio.  He had and Irish Catholic German grandmother that imparted a love for music to him.  

John had personal brokenness and was looking for meaning in life.  He died in a small experimental airplane accident, in 1997, at the young age of 53.  He was low on fuel and the levers that controlled the two fuel tanks were dysfunctional.

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Bibliography:

Annie's Song, Wikipedia
John Denver Bio., Wikipedia

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